Press reset

“Suddenly, saving our planet is within reach.”

— David Attenborough

We have just watched the brand new David Attenborough “witness statement” documentary on Netflix—his review and analysis of a life spent observing nature over 70+ years. We are greatly moved by his conclusions and recommendations, which add so much to our understanding of how we should be doing food.

Continue reading

Army grub

I have been trying to think of even one meal or dish I had in any Army mess hall that I would call memorable. Can’t do it. You know, make a connection—here on Veteran’s Day—between my Army service and my efforts here at DRB. It’s just not happening.

However, that won’t stop me from remembering and honoring all the vets I served with and all the others I didn’t. What you did is much appreciated this day and every day.

My mom used to bake cakes to take to the USO during WWII. My uncle died in Belgium in January ’45. I had it easy, spending my three years with the Old Guard at Ft. Myer, VA.

I was an Army photographer, so I never got behind the counter in a mess hall—except—for the five consecutive 14-hour days I spent on K.P. while in A.I.T. This was so we would not have to pull K.P again during our training. And we didn’t. But those five days taught more then I wanted to know about peeling potatoes and cleaning ovens—with the best steel wool and lemon juice the Army had to offer.

So, whether your service was in a jungle or desert, or behind a stove or camera, or just waiting patiently at home, you are honored today. Take a moment and think about what a great military and military tradition we have.

Bread, glorious bread

A tough topic for a Keto fan. What do I do about bread made from wheat flour—with all those carbs? Bread in all its forms is so basic, so universal, so loved. And the bread we know best is made from wheat flour. High in carbs and protein. The must-have food for probably every culture throughout history. Leavened or unleavened. Flat or raised. Three ingredients or many. But if you eat the typical American diet, you’re eating way too many carbs and carrying way too much weight. Ketoistas are going to have to do without the bread we love or find a palatable substitute for wheat-flour bread. What to do? Let’s start here with some background and a global perspective. Here’s a bread primer from The New Yorker:

Continue reading

Orange Marmalade Cake

Essentially a pound cake variation with major organginess, this is a great treat for breakfast, dessert, or afternoon tea. My version used a very rich orange marmalade that gave lots of flavor and made a substantial glaze. The cake kept for more than a week—seemed to get better as it aged. It really took me back to 4 o’clock tea with Grandma.

Source: Melissa Clark, one of my favs. Here’s a link to her video.

Continue reading

Dad’s little roasted potatoes

A great, inexpensive dish for one or a whole crowd. I love these when I add them to one of my sheet pan roasted dinners. But pan roasting works, too. These little fellas are sort of like your best French fries—rounds instead of sticks or planks—crispy outside, soft and tender inside. Yum. Can be varied indefinitely.

The Irish figured out a long time ago that potatoes can be good in many different ways. And choosing either starchier potatoes, like russets, or creamy potatoes, like Yukon Golds, will give you a very different, but equally good, taste and texture experience.

Continue reading

Egg McDad

Nearly went out to my local coffee shop for one of their breakfast sandwiches (a commuting standby when I was going into the office every day) when I realized I could make one at home. Using a leftover sausage patty, a fried egg, and a slice of American cheese, I came away a couple bucks better off and very satisfied with my solution.

Continue reading

Teach your children well

Hats off to Jamie Oliver for caring about kids health and better eating. His TED Talk from 2011 is still timely today—unfortunately. People still die prematurely and unnecessarily because of the “standard American diet,” so called. I sense that progress has been made since 2011, but as other news from the food front tells us, there is still a long way to go and mountains to climb everywhere along the food supply chain.

Cook the farm, live the food

Recommended by Alice Waters, this video and the people behind it are just a great encouragement that the revolution in how we think about our food and about cooking is happening and well worth our attention. Enjoy!

Cook the Farm from Anna Tasca Lanza Cooking School on Vimeo.

Grandma’s Irish soda bread

My Irish grandmother, Annie Allen, arrived at Ellis Island in 1909, a twenty-one-year-old with two little boys, four and two, in tow. I can’t imagine. She joined her husband, who’d come ahead two years earlier and had never met his son Sam. Grandma set up house, had two more kids, and lived a long life in her own home, cooking, baking, and tending her garden until she passed in her late 80’s. As a young lad, I enjoyed her “Irish Cake” sitting with her for tea, a ritual she held to every afternoon around four whether I was there or not. Grandma’s Irish Cake is a variety of Irish soda bread, loved by many. We never captured her exact recipe, which I can be sure, came straight from County Down, where Grandma probably learned it from her mother, Mary Anne McGee.

Continue reading

Mom’s potato salad

Summer’s here, and the time is right—for the old family recipe potato salad. The Queen Mum (this would be Dad’s mother-in-law) has a great recipe for potato salad that has been a family favorite for decades. She can’t recall where it came from and has “modified” whatever the original was, but she can’t quite recall how. This is no doubt the story of many old family recipes.

Continue reading
1 2 7
%d bloggers like this: